What’s in A Star Rating?

Co-authored by the Alliance and Visiting Nurse Associations of America

Over the past few months, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) introduction of patient experience survey star ratings to Home Health Compare, as a way to better understand the overall patient experience with care provided through Medicare-certified home health agencies, has gained a lot media attention.

While the jury is still out on the star ratings as a whole, home health agencies recognize that both quality of care and patient experience are critical. Agencies are learning from the issuance of the star ratings and are committed to improving their performance on both quality of care and patient experience.

Outlined below, the Alliance and VNAA breakdown the top five takeaways from the Patient Survey Star Ratings:

  1. The new patient survey star ratings do not replace, but instead are in addition to, the Quality of Patient Care Star Ratings used to describe the quality of clinical care provided by a Medicare-certified home health agency.
  2. Health care is moving towards a system that rewards value over volume and more readily engages consumers; as such, performance data will become increasingly important.
  3. The Home Health Compare Star Ratings are the first step towards streamlining communication regarding home health quality and patient experience in a way that is digestible to health care consumers.
  4. The discrepancies in the patient and quality ratings among individual agencies stem from several factors, including the limitation of the Medicare home health benefit, as well as the understanding of skilled versus non-skilled home health health services. For example, Medicare home health care provides skilled, clinical care, not services such as meal planning and house cleaning. Unfortunately, there is a disconnect for many patients when those needed non-clinical services are not met by their home health care team, despite receiving excellent clinical care.
  5. The patient experience survey is a positive step in the right direction, and is essential to capturing the overall home health care experience, but CMS must refine its metrics to capture more accurate data.

As organizations committed to advancing home health care, the Alliance and VNAA stand ready to work with the Administration to perfect the use of patient survey data so that it is balanced with necessary quality data.

March #HomeHealthChat: Interdisciplinary Teams

The March #HomeHealthChat was co-hosted by the ElderCare Workforce Alliance (@ElderCareTeam). The ElderCare Workforce Alliance is a group of 31 national organizations, joined together to address the immediate and future workforce crisis in caring for an aging America.

The #HomeHealthChat focused on Interdisciplinary Teams.

The Alliance hosts a home health-focused Twitter chat on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 2 pm ET. Be sure to check here for updates on topics, co-hosts, and questions!

If you have topic ideas for future Twitter chats, or are interested in co-hosting a chat, please contact the Alliance’s Director of Communications and Events Jen Schiller here.

Below are some of the highlights from the chat:

Celebrating Women in Home Health Care

Happy International Women’s Day!

Women are vital to home health care, both as employees and patients, and today we celebrate the contributions of women in the industry and the patients who benefit from their care.

The National Women’s History Museum credits Lillian D. Wald, founder of what is today the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, with inspiring the New York Board of Health to organize the first public nursing system in the world.

Nationally, women are tremendous assets to our healthcare industry, and this is especially true for home health care. In 2014, a whopping 88.6% of persons employed in home health services were women; that’s over a million women employed in the industry! Nationwide, women make up roughly 47% of the workforce, and while women are more likely to work in the health care industry writ large (78.6%), home health care is still even more female-dominated than the industry as a whole. Within the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ “health care and social assistance” industry marker, home health care services employ the second greatest percentage of women.

It’s not just in the workforce where women are prominent. Looking at information from the 2015 Home Health Chartbook, home health patients are also more likely to be women, with females comprising 61.5% of home health users (compared with 54.6% of all Medicare beneficiaries). Women actually comprise a smaller percentage of home health users than males under age 85, but over a quarter of female home health users are over 85.

Diving deeper into the demographics, women are three times more likely than their male counterparts to be widowers, while less than a third are married. Women who receive Medicare home health services are also much more likely than male users to have an income below $25,000 a year.

According to the Kaiser Family Foundation’s 2009 fact sheet on “Medicare’s Role for Women” across the Medicare population, women are more likely than men to suffer from arthritis, hypertension, and osteoporosis. Almost 50% of women, compared with 38% of men, suffer from three or more chronic conditions. That same paper noted that while Medicare plays a critical role for women, women are still more likely than men to spend a greater share of their incomes on medical care. It is therefore crucial to continue finding ways to both ensure funding of the program and new innovation and models to help women face the challenges posed by a rapidly aging population.

Home health care is shaped very much by women, as patients, providers, and innovators. Today we thank them, and look forward to their continued role in molding the home health care delivery system of the future.